THE PAVILIONS PHUKET BRITISH INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL, PHUKET Kata Rocks
Login | Create Account Poll Currency Weather Facebook Youtube Search

3rd Army boss regrets quick tongue

BANGKOK: Third Region Army commander Vijak Siribansop had no idea he would still be answering questions about the extra-judicial killing of Lahu hilltribe rights advocate, Chaiyaphum Pasae, a full year after the incident occurred on March 17 last year.

deathdrugscrimemilitaryMyanmartransport
By Bangkok Post

Monday 28 May 2018, 09:16AM


Third Region Army commander Lt Gen Vijak Siribansop (right) inspects denuded hills in Nan where soldiers are tracking down suspects who cut down protected trees and are allegedly involved in drug trade. Photo: Post Today

Third Region Army commander Lt Gen Vijak Siribansop (right) inspects denuded hills in Nan where soldiers are tracking down suspects who cut down protected trees and are allegedly involved in drug trade. Photo: Post Today

Lt Gen Vijak, who leads active suppression squads against the heavy proliferation of drug smuggling in the North, even earned the notorious alias “Ti Auto” from Chaiyaphum’s extra-judicial killing.

The incident, the commander said, does not discourage him from cracking down on transnational drug rings. He only needs to be more careful about his words, he said.

Combatting drug traffickers is his priority. He insisted there is no let-up in the authorities’ fight against drug traffickers and couriers in the North under the army’s jurisdiction he leads.

He is all ears to intelligence reports about frequent drug trafficking.

“About 500 million methamphetamine pills (ya bah) will be smuggled into Thailand soon,” Lt Gen Vijak told the Bangkok Post, citing intelligence warnings from the Office of the Narcotic Control Board. The pills would be smuggled in over an unspecified period of time.

He admitted the high-profile Chaiyaphum’s extra-judicial killing has generated much criticism which marred his reputation.

Chaiyaphum, who was suspected of possessing thousands of speed pills, was shot dead near a military-supervised checkpoint in Chiang Mai’s Chiang Dao district. The military claimed the shot was fired because the suspect tried to throw a hand grenade at soldiers.

One soldier fired a single bullet in “self-defence” which killed the 17-year-old. Lt Gen Vijak said the soldier had no intention to kill the rights advocate.

The 3rd Army chief later made a controversial comment, saying he would have fired with an automatic gun if he were that soldier. The comment instantly earned him the alias “Ti Auto”; Ti being his nickname and Auto for the automatic gun.

“I just wanted to make a comparison,” Lt Gen Vijak said, adding he wanted to explain that the soldier was well-trained while he, by comparison, would not have shot with such precision.

“It’s a lesson learned for me. I have to be more careful when talking to the media,” Lt Gen Vijak said. “I regret the incident.”

Now he is concentrating on anti-drug operations in the far North where, despite the continued crackdowns, the drug situation has shown no sign of abating.

In crackdowns between April and May, authorities seized a combined 30mn ya bah pills, over one kilogram of crystal methamphetamine (ya ice), in targeted areas in Chiang Mai and Chiang Rai.

However, these drug interceptions, which were mainly based on intelligence reports and tip-offs, have stopped a large quantity of drugs from being trafficked and cost the drug network at least B4 billion.

His troops, together with state agencies, are preparing new sting operations in response to a report that about 500mn ya bah pills, produced by the two main Wa ethnic groups in Myanmar, will soon be slipped into Thailand.

New Paths Retreat

The pills produced by the Wa Nua (Northern Wa) are recognisable by the “Y1” embossed on the tablets while the pills manufactured by the Wa Tai (Southern Wa) typically bear the “999” mark on them.

He said a failure to stem the inflow of the drugs would turn Thailand into a transit point for drug re-export to other countries.

The ya bah pills are delivered to southern Thailand before they are smuggled into Malaysia and Indonesia while the ya ice is destined for Australia, Lt Gen Vijak said.

He conceded soldiers alone cannot stamp out drug traffickers. They need help from other state agencies as well as from people in Myanmar on whose side of the border area some drug factories are reported to be produced by ethnic groups.

Lt Gen Vijak said the armed ethnic rebel groups, including the Wa, have not agreed to peace talks with the Myanmar government. The proposed talks are believed to hold promises for a permanent drug eradication plan. Their long-running internal conflicts have motivated minority groups to keep selling the drugs as they need money to buy weapons.

Lt Gen Vijak said allegations had arisen that some weapons were sent via courier service companies from the eastern border provinces of Thailand to the northern border and supplied to the ethnic minority groups. The companies had no idea they were transporting weapons.

Thai and Myanmar authorities are working together to tackle the weapon and drug problems. “We turn to each other for help,” Lt Gen Vijak said.

“They [Myanmar] will help us crack down on drug traffickers while we intercept the weapons and block them from reaching minority groups in Myanmar.”

Lt Gen Vijak said the Thai authorities are fully able to stop arms smugglers.

The commander said the authorities have sent details of 18 Thai drug suspects to Myanmar’s narcotic agency which will arrest them. The suspects are thought to have fled to the neighbouring country.

“I also learn that Myanmar has increasingly put pressure on the Wa armed groups,” he said. As a result, large quantities of ya bah pills were seized in Tachilek, opposite Mae Sai district in Chiang Rai. These anti-drug operations have built an image of Lt Gen Vijak as a drug buster of the North.

However, there is another side to the commander 0 Lt Gen Vijak can cook up a storm.

The former student of Class 18 at Armed Forces Academies Preparatory School is known to his friends, including his close friend, 4th Army chief Lt Gen Piyawat Nakwanich, as “chef Ti”.

His skills and fondness of culinary arts have seen him cook for family, friends and customers. He runs a restaurant in Lampang, his home province, and plans to open a branch in Nan.

Read original story here.

 

 

Comment on this story

* Please login to comment. If you do not have an account please register below by simply entering a username, password and email address. You can still leave your comment below at the same time.

Comments Here:
Comments Left:
# Characters
Username:
Password:
E-mail:
Security:

Rorri_2 | 29 May 2018 - 17:45:47

"Well, no he doesn't talk too much", well sorry, yes he does, he was never asked  if, and how many, drugs will be "smuggled" into Thailand soon; so he does talk too much, effectively pre-warning the smuggles... if in fact he is telling the truth, or simply big noting himself.

Jor12 | 28 May 2018 - 17:28:37

Well, no he doesn't talk too much. He was responding to media questions. Just like people on here who make silly outlandish irrelevant statements. He has job to do and appears to be doing it quite well, rather than the shiny pants brigade who have nothing better to do than write on PN. 

Kurt | 28 May 2018 - 10:08:26

Indeed, Ti-Auto talks to much.
His 'quick tongue' warned the smugglers in BangkokPost who according Ti-Auto soon will smuggle 500 million pills ya Bah into Thailand.
Thank you, Ti-Auto for warning smugglers in advance.
Is this the best man Thailand has to prevent drugs transports into Thailand?  Poor Thailand.
Why not retire and be just Chef-Ti in his restaurants?

Have a news tip-off? Click here

 

Phuket community
Phuket pharmacists up in arms over Drugs Act

What is so puzzling about what the legislation proscribes? What is puzzling is why a military junta ...(Read More)


American tourist in ICU after Krabi rock climbing fall

As a patient (since deceased) or relative of the deceased, one would be mortified to read comments c...(Read More)


Phuket Opinion: The world is watching us

If the Thai basher would only read the article, it was not Thai's worried about international pe...(Read More)


Poor service quality dogs airport ranking

Hire foreign professionals to upgrade Suvarnabhumi airport. Abroad many countries do that a few year...(Read More)


Over 1,000 arrested in Phuket ‘Operation X-Ray Outlaw Foreigner’ clampdown

Question again: Where are these 1463 foreigners hold presently until they get deported? Not in Phuke...(Read More)


New Phuket Provincial Prison reaches half-way mark

Phuket Town prison, built for 750 prisoners. Now holding a total of 3131 prisoners! To say that the...(Read More)


Phuket Vegetarian Festival takes to the streets

I am well aware as would most intelligent people of the implications of the devotees in this festiva...(Read More)


Poor service quality dogs airport ranking

Thailand's bullheaded bureaucracies will ensure that nothing changes. As the AoT continues to m...(Read More)


Cocaine, heroin popular among specific groups in Patong, police play down claim

When a town police chief plays down a Vice Governor we face a Phuket authority struggle. And for the...(Read More)


Phuket pharmacists up in arms over Drugs Act

Well, this whole affair/plan is already off the table, but I was puzzled by the term "health p...(Read More)


 

Melbourne Cup 2018