THE PAVILIONS PHUKET BRITISH INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL, PHUKET Kata Rocks
Login | Create Account Poll Currency Weather Facebook Youtube Search

The Laos Connection

LAOS: The downfall of millionaire “Mr X”, long shielded by cash and contacts in Laos, has highlighted the role of the secretive, communist country in showering pills across Southeast Asia.

crimedrugstransportpolice
By AFP

Saturday 20 May 2017, 03:00PM


Allegedly a key figure among gangs buying drugs from Myanmar’s meth labs, Laotian Xaysana Keophimpha – dubbed ‘Mr X’ – is believed to have used his graft-riddled country to shuttle narcotics south, first through Thailand then onto Malaysia.

The heavy-set 42-year-old was arrested by armed Thai police on January 19 at Bangkok’s main airport en route to Laos where he lived freely, revelling in a lifestyle of celebrity parties and supercars.

He denies charges of drug possession and smuggling.

But subsequent police operations have turned up several more men accused of running drugs through Laos, an opaque country whose role in the regional narcotics trade is gradually emerging.

They are the suspected middlemen of the ‘Golden Triangle’, shifting pills, ice and heroin from the world’s second largest drug producing zone to a regional market.

Among the accused is Xaysana’s friend Sisouk Daoheoung – a minor Laos celebrity with a penchant for thoroughbred horses and a shared devotion to fast cars and fancy holidays flaunted on social media.

If police are right, their ostentation in one of Asia’s poorest countries was funded by smuggling highly-addictive caffeine-laced methamphetamine pills – better known as ‘ya bah’ or crazy medicine – and crystal meth (ya ice).

“From Xaysana’s phone and Facebook records it was clear he and Sisouk are friends... their (drug) groups are connected,” Thai Police Major-General Supakit Srijantranon said last week.

At $8 (B276) a pop in Thailand, the best ya bah pills rise in price the further they move from source, bringing extraordinary rewards to the traffickers.

Stamped with a distinctive 'WY', the pink and green pills of the Myanmar drug labs are supercharging everyone from Malaysian farm hands to Bangkok’s “Hi-So” (high society) party crowd.

Each year regional seizures break records, according to the UN’s crime agency.

That points to better law enforcement, they say, but it also show that the cartels can ramp up production at will to cover losses.

The highest quality pills (15-20% meth purity) come from the factories of the North and South Wa – armed ethnic groups marshalling a self-governing state on the Myanmar-China border – and by the Lahu hill tribe.

Poor, corrupt and bordering five countries, Laos makes for an ideal transit route to the rest of Southeast Asia.

Drugs are shifted across the Mekong river into Thailand then onto Malaysia and beyond.

Thailand is being hit hard by the trade.

Between October last year and April, Thailand seized 74 million ya bah pills, according to the kingdom’s Narcotics Control Board (NCB), as well as two tonnes of ya ice and 320 kilograms of heroin.

QSI International School Phuket

Official estimates say the kingdom has around 1.3 million addicts, with drug convictions accounting for the bulk of Thailand’s prison population of 290,000 – the tenth highest incarceration rate in the world.

“Drugs are destroying everything. They affect the security of our country, our society and people,” NCB secretary-general Sirinya Sitdhichai said.

Cops are fighting back and say they have battered three major Laos-linked drug networks, confiscating tens of millions of dollars-worth of assets including hotels, cars, cash and even a horse riding school in Vientiane.

They are still hunting a fourth group led by Usman Salameang, a Thai believed to be holed up in Laos, wanted for moving gear through Thailand’s violent border area into Malaysia.

“He is the only big boss we are still trying to arrest,” Sirinya said.

Historically, communist Laos has been reluctant to admit it has a drug problem.

But under Prime Minister Thongloun Sisoulith the country is keen to show it is flushing out criminals and corrupt officials.

The recent arrests are part of his get-tough message to the drug gangs.

Last year Laos authorities reeled in a record 144 kilograms of ya ice and nearly 21 million ya bah pills.

The once toothless Lao National Commission for Drug Control and Supervision (LCDC), has been beefed up under control of the Ministry of Public Security.

The fall of Xaysana and co. is being bundled up as victory for intelligence-sharing between Laos and Thailand.

But with many western embassies still unable to post specialist narcotics police in Laos it is hard to get facts on the country’s suspected role as a haven for drug producers.

The LCDC did not respond requests for comment.

And while Laos authorities sweep up mid-ranking henchmen they do not touch “the major organised crime behind significant production and trafficking,” according to Jeremy Douglas of the UNODC.

Questions remain over how high-profile suspects could have operated beyond the law for so long.

One reason for that impunity is their aversion to publicity and violence – in contrast to their Latin American peers – a western drug enforcement official said, requesting anonymity.

They live by a maxim of “Don’t bring attention to your operations. You work in silence, you work in the dark.”

 

 

Comment on this story

* Please login to comment. If you do not have an account please register below by simply entering a username, password and email address. You can still leave your comment below at the same time.

Comments Here:
Comments Left:
# Characters
Username:
Password:
E-mail:
Security:

Be the first to comment.

Have a news tip-off? Click here

 

Phuket community
Residents, hotels blamed for Nai Yang canal pollution

I sent photos to the PN years ago of this at Nai Yang. The black water entering and moving along the...(Read More)


Navy in motion to remove Phuket seastead

Trust they will all receive medals....(Read More)


Patong police, taxi drivers meet to discuss service, behaviour

Yet more positive PR for Phuket. Telling the world that our taxi drivers are so bad that they have t...(Read More)


Australian stabbed 12 times trying to protect Thai woman

Thai Government should show respect and appreciation to this Australian man who was defending a thai...(Read More)


Phuket Opinion: For stupidity, click repeat

Clear Opinion piece! Well, the navy has nothing to do,they are happy to make from a mouse a 'ma...(Read More)


Mains water supply outage announced

No water supply, no electricity, by temperatures around 37 degrees. Great time management....(Read More)


Navy in motion to remove Phuket seastead

What is the difference between a anchored vessel and a anchored seastead? Is the thai law clear in t...(Read More)


Patong police, taxi drivers meet to discuss service, behaviour

'We' do this nonsense AFTER the high season when tourists are gone., not BEFORE. We do it th...(Read More)


Phuket Opinion: For stupidity, click repeat

"But one thing that has surfaced from the seastead farce: a whole new form of tourism accommoda...(Read More)


Australian stabbed 12 times trying to protect Thai woman

I agree with CJ69 100%. However, there is a good chance that like the several 100K or millions of ...(Read More)