THE PAVILIONS PHUKET BRITISH INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL, PHUKET Kata Rocks
Login | Create Account Poll Currency Weather Facebook Youtube Search

Coal for water: crisis incoming

Greenpeace International’s first global plant-by-plant study of the coal industry’s current and future water demand is a warning to Thailand.


By The Phuket News

Tuesday 26 April 2016, 06:35PM


The Great Water Grab: How the coal industry is deepening the global water crisis.

The Great Water Grab: How the coal industry is deepening the global water crisis.

The world’s rapidly dwindling freshwater resources could be further depleted if plans for hundreds of new coal power plants worldwide go ahead, threatening severe drought and competition, according to a new Greenpeace International report.

“If all the proposed coal plants would be built, the water consumed by coal power plants around the world would almost double. We now know that coal not only pollutes our skies and fuels climate change, it also deprives us of our most precious resources: water,” said Harri Lammi, a Greenpeace senior global campaigner on coal.

Thailand is in the grip of its worst drought for more than 20 years, with water levels in the country’s biggest dams lower than 10 per cent. Phuket’s authority have given assurance that there is enough water for Phuket, but already, some in Phuket are having difficulties getting an adequate amount of water from the public water service.

Phuket wise, Thailand’s Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) is moving ahead with a planned coal fired electricity plant for Phuket, to keep up with future electricity needs. In Phuket, there has been some activity against the EGAT’s plan.

The Greenpeace report is the first global plant-by-plant study of the coal industry’s current and future water demand. The research also identifies the regions that are already in water deficit, where existing and proposed coal plants would speed up the depletion of water resources.

Globally, 8,359 existing coal power plant units already consume enough water to meet the basic water needs of 1 billion people. A quarter of the proposed new coal plants are planned in regions
already running a freshwater deficit, where water is used faster than it is naturally replenishing, which Greenpeace calls red-list areas.

The top countries with proposed additional coal plant capacity in red-list areas are China (237 GW), India (52 GW) and Turkey (7 GW). Almost half of the proposed Chinese coal fleet is in red list areas. In India and Turkey this figure is 13%.

Coal is one of the most water-intensive methods of generating electricity. According to the International Energy Agency, coal could account for 50% of the growth in global water consumption for power generation over the next 20 years.

Greenpeace research shows that if the proposed coal plants come online, their consumption of water will increase by 90%. Given the deepening water crisis in the major coal power bases, it is unbelievable that plans for hundreds of new coal plants are even being considered.

“Governments must recognise that replacing coal with renewable energy will not only help them deliver on their climate agreements, but also deliver huge water savings. It’s more urgent than ever that we move towards a 100% renewable future,” said Iris Cheng, lead author of the Greenpeace International report.

 

 

Comment on this story

* Please login to comment. If you do not have an account please register below by simply entering a username, password and email address. You can still leave your comment below at the same time.

Comments Here:
Comments Left:
# Characters
Username:
Password:
E-mail:
Security:

Jome | 27 April 2016 - 23:30:11

It states that using coal for electricity generation creates big water consumption...thats is not true..it is same as other fuels...

Joe12 | 27 April 2016 - 20:40:34

Jome...the article does not state that "...mining coal does require big water consumption".

Jome | 27 April 2016 - 14:04:58

This article is completely stupid....I am not aware that mining coal does require big water consumption.

Burning coal to create steam for electric power generator turbines requires the same amount of water as oil,gas,or nuclear fuel.
The point is to stop burning fuel and use solar or wind power...

malczx7r | 26 April 2016 - 19:09:05

With all the sun here, you'd think solar would be ideal!

Have a news tip-off? Click here

 

Phuket community
Aircraft maintenance worker, 22, dies after motorbike hits parked bus

What is the minimum distance a car, truck, bus is allowed to park before/after a curve?...(Read More)


Family matters: The mother-son team behind a new cafe in Chalong

It might be helpful if you told us where this cafe is as I'd like to try it....(Read More)


Aircraft maintenance worker, 22, dies after motorbike hits parked bus

Why are such "small" vehicles, a bus, allowed to park, on the road, no wonder people drive...(Read More)


Disaster officials issue fire warning as small wildfires break out

Wonder how much water is still available on Phuket island for fire fighting. Not mentioning the nee...(Read More)


Disaster officials issue fire warning as small wildfires break out

Now, from Chalong, at 16:15 hrs clearly to see on the hill, right below Big Buddha, rubbish burning,...(Read More)


Aircraft maintenance worker, 22, dies after motorbike hits parked bus

... Fearful, the driver of the parked bus fled the scene...leaving a bag with all his identifying ma...(Read More)


Election Commission issues defamation warning

Imagine if the developed world had such laws. This does raise the question as to how to campaign eff...(Read More)


Power outage in Thalang

And nothing change to country 4.0 doings. Continue the old way of keeping cables at poles, instead u...(Read More)


Phuket health officials, police unite to enforce Makha Bucha alcohol ban

Why not have all non-'budhists' wear arm-bands with a distinguishing logo? They could be giv...(Read More)


Taxi blames oil spill for wipeout

Unless one wants to live in a Police state, where everything and everyone is under surveillance, the...(Read More)